Giving Your Speech

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What are the best ways to deliver a presentation or speech that is persuasive and gets the result you want?

Here are some points to consider when giving a speech:-

Obviously to persuade most effectively a speaker must select material (illustrations, quotations, facts, and figures of speech) suitable for the situation and audience, then present this material in an interesting, convincing, persuasive manner.
Will a speaker write his speech word for word and then read it to an audience? Heaven forbid! — unless he has to. Sometimes political, or highly controversial speeches, are read to keep the speaker from being misquoted or sued. Walter Winchell, for instance, has his radio scripts checked and double-checked by attorneys before he reads them to the public.. The average speaker, however, usually does not have to be so exacting.
Shall he memorize his talk then? Not unless he wants to sound like a machine giving a canned speech. Most people can’t memorize well enough to keep from reciting as they speak. Such speaking lacks a conversational tone. Instead of being real talk memorized speaking is more likely to sound like a child learning to read: “My— dog’s — name—is— Carlo. Carlo — can — run. Run — Carlo — run.”
Also, a memorized talk is too easily forgotten. It usually lacks warmth, and surely it does not have that informal, put-them-at-ease quality which is evident in lively conversation. A few professional speakers have successfully used memorized speeches, but most speakers simply do not have the time or patience to perfect a memorized talk. Fortunately there are better methods.
Speak from notes? If you need them;
A speaker may use notes to outline his speech. These notes should be phrases or short sentences to remind the speaker of his illustrations or other supporting material. Quotations may be written out in full and read for accuracy, unless the speaker can quote them from memory without hesitation. When a speaker can remember quotations and facts without the use of notes the effect upon an audience is probably more persuasive. But it is better to read them than to present them in a stumbling, uncertain manner.

What do you think about these points on deliverying a speech? What do you think about reading it or memorizing it? Do you have any experiences you would like to share?

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